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ADM is probably the most important part of TOGAF. It is core to TOGAF and is referred to throughout the TOGAF Standard. The ADM is a method for developing and managing Enterprise Architecture projects. It has eight phases that are one after another worked on. In addition, the Architecture Development Method suggests a couple of possible cycles and iterations. Each phase has an objective, an approach, inputs, outputs, and is broken down into more detailed steps. Inputs are always developed in one of the earlier phases and often in the phase just before the current one. Also, every phase provides concrete outputs that the following steps use as input. All phases are named from A to H. In addition, the ADM has a requirements management phase in the center of the circle.

The ADM has the following steps:

- Preliminary Phase: Consideration and management of everything that has to be done before the actual development method can start. This includes for instance how the ADM should exactly look like, what tools should be used to support the project (e.g. which enterprise architecture tool should be used for modelling?), and assessing and managing budget and resources.

- Architecture Vision (A): The vision provides the overall scope of the architecture work. Therefore, the vision is defined, constraints and expectations are assessed. Also, stakeholders are determined and approval from them to start the architecture work is requested. In this phase, the Statement of Architecture Work is created, which is further enhanced and elaborated in the subsequent phases.

- Business Architecture (B): The Business Architecture usually deals with processes, business capabilities, or user journeys. Here, the As-Is and the To-Be of the business architecture is defined and the results are used to amend the Statement of Architecture Work from the Architecture Vision phase. The structure of the phases B, C, and D are alike.

- Information Systems Architecture (C): The Information Systems Architecture includes applications and data architecture. Here, the As-Is and the To-Be of the data and applications architecture is defined and the results are used to amend the Statement of Architecture Work from the Architecture Vision phase. The structure of the phases B, C, and D are alike.

- Technology Architecture (D): Technology Architecture includes the technologies that are underlying the application architecture, such as servers, middleware, and clients. Here, the As-Is and the To-Be of the technology architecture is defined and the results are used to amend the Statement of Architecture Work from the Architecture Vision phase. The structure of the phases B, C, and D are alike.

- Opportunities & Solutions (E): In this phase, the architectural pieces of the previous phases are brought together and analyzed according to their opportunity to improve the architecture and how possible solutions could look like. Those are called solution architectures. This is also the phase in which dependencies, benefits, and costs of the potential solutions are assessed and where the decision for a particular solution is taken if there are several possible choices. Lastly, it is the Opportunities and Solutions phase in which an overall implementation and migration strategy and plan is drafted, which serves as major input for the next phase.

- Migration Planning (F): What has been assessed in high-level in the previous phase, is now done in more details. Therefore, dependencies and timelines are used to detail the migration and implementation strategy into a detailed plan. This also includes all other aspects of migration planning, such as planning the go-live, considering current solutions and contingency plannings, as well as cultural impacts.

- Implementation Governance (G): The governance phase deals with architectural contracts and committee decisions. Governance is typically ensured via regular governance body meetings, such as an “Implementation Governance Board”. The major goal is to ensure that the project development conforms to the architecture.

- Architecture Change Management (H): This phase addresses the continuous monitoring of the progress and especially of changed or adapted requirements, constraints or other circumstances.

- Requirements Management: This phase is not part of the actual cycle but is positioned in the center of all phases. It ensures that all ADM phases consider the corresponding business requirements.

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